The School Bulletin of New Caney High School

Eagle Times Bulletin

  • 2017-2018 School year begins Monday, August 28, 2017

Vincent Van Gogh: A Post-Impressionist Artist Interpreting the World

Ruth Caster, Writer

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Eccentric in nature, yet brilliant in talent, Vincent Van Gogh, a well known artist, draws people’s interest from around the world. His paintings, acknowledge in all cultures, have gained popularity because of their distinct qualities, and  people have nicknamed him the “tortured artist”. Vincent, born in 1853 and raised in Holland, grew up in a religious family with his father as a minister.

When his general education ended, Vincent followed his uncle’s profession as an art dealer. After working initially in Holland and later in England and France, he learned the art trade. However, Vincent grew tired of the art business and lost interest in it.

Afterwards, at 27 years old, Van Gogh entered the Academie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, Belgium. The following winter, living in Amsterdam, Vincent fell in love, had his heart broken, and then started painting.  Instead of achieving many accomplishments, during the next few years, Vincent attained little success in both love and art.

Painted in 1885, Van Gogh’s “Potato Eaters” represents his first major work. By this time, he still had difficulty finding love, but began to receive interest in his paintings. Now fully devoting himself to painting, living frugally, studying color theory, he admired artists like Peter Paul Rubens.

Unfortunately, throughout his entire life, Vincent’s paintings seemed impossible to sell to the general public. His brother Theo, an art dealer and recipient of Vincent’s many letters, recommended that he should add more color to his work.

The next year, Vincent moved to Paris where his art began to take on the style that would make him famous. In Paris, he discussed art with some of the most avant-garde and influential artists during his time. He thereafter began using more color, applying the paint with thick, bold brushstrokes, and painted all that surrounded him with dash and flair.

After ten years and producing some 900 paintings, including his famous masterpieces “Starry Night” and “The Cafe”, Vincent van Gogh took his own life in 1890. Never fully appreciated in his own time, it would not take long for art world critics to recognize the prodigious artist they lost.

Vincent Van Gogh–not an ordinary artist, but an outstanding one!

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The School Bulletin of New Caney High School
Vincent Van Gogh: A Post-Impressionist Artist Interpreting the World