The School Bulletin of New Caney High School

Eagle Times Bulletin

  • 2017-2018 School year begins Monday, August 28, 2017

War on Drugs

Ruth Caster, Writer

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Four decades ago, the United States government declared a “war on drugs”, from the rise and fall of drug leaders to current intervening efforts and stamping them out.

On July 14, 1969 during a special Congressional message that Presidential Richard Nixon identified drug abuse as “a serious national threat”, he cited a dramatic jump in drug-related juvenile arrests and street crime between 1960 and 1967. Nixon called for a national anti-drug policy that would operate at both the state and federal level.

During June 1971, Nixon, who officially declared a war on drugs, identified drug abuse as “Public Enemy No.1”. Two years later, he created the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA),  coordinating agencies’ efforts to enforce, control, and regulate against illegal substances.

Nevertheless, these unavailing programs function with only futile and feeble efficacy.

Appallingly expensive, even tragically time consuming,  it now costs $12.6 billion U.S. dollars annually arrest and prosecute narcotics abusers every year, and it takes approximately 1.5 years to investigate drug crimes. Showing no signs of  abating, these costs usually increase 20% every year, and investigating and resolving them equals the same time length.

In 1979, Former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter campaigned for president on a platform that included marijuana decriminalization and ending federal criminal penalties for possessing one ounce or less.

Unlike adequate and productive programs, drug war funding has produced minimal results. From a financial viewpoint, it inefficiently costs taxpayers billions annually fighting drug wars , and the government makes free individuals follow certain questionable laws or face prosecution.

The war on drugs may have lowered some addiction rates, treated certain drug abuse, and changed various lives, but at the same time , it has brought a massive societal harm by causing people to lose their employment and it destroys their lives when even convicted of possessing a marijuana cigarette. Instead of helping people with medical care, who dearly need assistance ending their drug abuse, the court incarcerates them for a specific time period.

If the government truly wants to end drug wars, then they should sufficiently fund rehabilitation centers for people who need it, rather than imprisoning them, causing more harm than good. People that have narcotics in their systems suffer enough, yet sentencing them to prison does not resolve their problems. They need help with living a healthier lifestyle and breaking their hopeless addictions, rather than serving a prison sentence for a preventable crime such as drug abuse.

When will this war end?

“Every form of addiction is bad, no matter whether the narcotic is alcohol or morphine or idealism”, Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections.

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The School Bulletin of New Caney High School
War on Drugs