The School Bulletin of New Caney High School

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  • 2017-2018 School year begins Monday, August 28, 2017

Susan B. Anthony: Fighting For Women’s Rights

Emily Brubaker, Writer

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Born on February 15, 1820, in Adams, Massachusetts, Susan B. Anthony grew up in a Quaker home filled with long activist traditions. Developing a sense of justice and moral zeal at a young age, her participation in temperance movements increased.

Participating in several abolitionist movement, Anthony worked as an agent for the Anti-Slavery Society, arranging meetings, making speeches, hanging posters, and distributing leaflets. She encountered hostile mobs, armed threats, and objects thrown at her.

Working as the head of the girls’ department at Canajoharie Academy in 1846, Anthony spoke before the state teachers’ convention, arguing for coeducation, claiming the differences between the minds of men and women did not exist. Anthony called for equal educational opportunities for all regardless of race.

Returning to Rochester in 1849, Anthony served as president of the Rochester branch of the Daughters of Temperance and raised money for the cause. In the 1870s Anthony refused to support Prohibition because she believed it detracted attention from the cause of woman suffrage.

Moreover, Susan B. Anthony noticed from her work for temperance that women needed the vote if they had a chance of influencing public affairs. In 1869 the suffrage movement split, with Anthony and Stanton’s National Association continuing to campaign for a constitutional amendment, and the American Woman Suffrage Association adopting a strategy of earning the vote for women on a state-to-state basis.

Campaigning vigorously for women’s suffrage, Anthony went on speaking tours in the West. In 1877, she gathered petitions from 26 states with 10,000 signatures, but Congress laughed at her. Appearing before every congress from 1869 to 1906 to ask for passage of a suffrage amendment.

Susan B. Anthony died in 1906 at her home in Rochester. Women finally earned the right to vote in 1920 because of the Nineteenth Amendment.

 

 

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The School Bulletin of New Caney High School
Susan B. Anthony: Fighting For Women’s Rights